Robert E. Bomar

Robert E. Bomar

Enshrined November 10, 2007

Shelbyville’s “Bomar Field” Airport was literally Bomar’s field for years until it was first leased then purchased by the City of Shelbyville. The airport was built and owned by Bob Bomar; begun while he was home on leave as a Navy Pilot in 1944. Before enlisting in the Navy, Bob Bomar graduated from Cumberland University’s first Civilian Pilot Training Class in 1939. While in the service, Bob flew various Navy fighter aircraft in the European and Pacific theatres. Bomar aspired to an airline career but his entire life has been dedicated to general aviation where he earned a reputation as staunch advocate early in his career.

Governor Frank Clement sought Bomar’s counsel in 1953 that resulted in saving the floundering Tennessee Bureau of Aeronautics. That same year the Governor appointed a five-member Aeronautics Commission to oversee and manage the Bureau. Fifty airports were constructed across Tennessee between 1953 to 1968 while Bob Bomar chaired and served on the Tennessee Aeronautics Commission. From 1968 until 1992 Bob devoted himself to the Shelbyville Airport and upon retirement in 1992, he and his late wife were honored as recipients of Tennessee’s “Career Contributions to Aviation” award.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

Stan Brock

Stan Brock

Enshrined November 10, 2007

Englishman, now long-time Knoxvillian, Stan Brock is recognized by many as the former co-star of the television series Wild Kingdom, but his true legacy will be indelibly cast as the Founder of the Remote Area Medical Volunteer Corps, a non-profit, volunteer, airborne relief effort dedicated to serving mankind by providing free health, dental and eye care as well as veterinary, technical and educational assistance to people in remote areas of the United States and the world. Brock founded Remote Area Medical in Knoxville in 1985. He and a huge cast of volunteer doctors, nurses, pilots, veterinarians and support workers work without pay as they participate in expeditions to help others, all at their own expense. Stan Brock learned to fly in Georgetown, Guiana many years ago and now has over 8,000 hours of flying time. He is an Air Transport rated pilot and Certified Flight Instructor.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

Lanny G. Culver

Lanny G. Culver

(1939-2010) Enshrined November 10, 2007

Louisiana native Lanny Culver made an extraordinary mark in aviation in Memphis that began when he became Vice President of world famous Jack Adams Aircraft Sales in 1972. It is said that Lanny Culver’s name will always be at the forefront of those who took business aircraft sales from its beginnings to the multi-billion dollar business it is today, and for helping establish Memphis as a hub for business aviation. Culver was a visionary who developed an extraordinary knowledge of the world market for aircraft. His impeccable integrity, ethics and business acumen earned Lanny a global reputation as the consummate professional in the business and corporate aircraft industry. A stroke in April 2001 ended a career of leadership, innovation and integrity that will always be the legacy of Lanny Culver.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

William S. Whitmore

William S. Whitmore

 (1923-2001) Enshrined November 10, 2007

Bill Whitmore’s aviation career began in 1942 when he became a Marine Aviator. He flew 168 missions in WWII in the F4U Corsair and the AD-4 Skyraider attack bomber in Korea and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. Whitmore began what was to become a distinguished 30-year career with the Federal Aviation Administration in 1961. His logbook contains evidence that he conducted over 5,000 pilot check rides but his legacy is his extraordinary contributions to aviation safety in Tennessee. In 1990 when he retired from the FAA, the Tennessee Aeronautics Commission awarded Bill Whitmore its highest individual honor for his “Career Contributions to Aviation in Tennessee.”

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com