Joseph R. Fleeman

Joseph R. Fleeman

Enshrined November 3, 2012

While in high school Joe began to fly and also began rebuilding and repairing airplanes under the supervision of his father. During this time, Joe developed a deep interest in aviation and discovered his love for restoration. His first project was a 1940 Piper J-5A Cub Cruiser that he and his uncle bought together. This was also the airplane he soloed in and got his commercial license in. The longest project was a 1943 Twin Cessna T-50 nicknamed the “Bamboo Bomber.” Because of being built mostly of tubing and wood it was a 5-year project. He bought the plane in Pensacola, FL and transported it back to Lawrenceburg in pieces and started rebuilding the airplane piece by piece. He refinished each part inside and out like a piece of furniture. The award winning “Bomber” flew better that a factory new aircraft. This was the aircraft he used to get his multi-engine rating. Through the years, the quality and renowned reputation of Joe Fleeman became well known among the aviation community across the United States. Joe has rebuilt some 20 aircraft to better than new condition. Among them was a Mustang II with a top speed of 225 mph. Joe has presented several aircraft at the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Oshkosh AirVenture throughout the years and is a three time Grand Champion with a 1940 Piper J-5, 1955 Piper Tri-Pacer, and 1937 Bucker Jungmeister.  He also won two Reserve Grand Champions with 1953 Piper Tri-Pacer and a 1946 Piper J-3 Cub. He won Grand Champion Classic with a 1943 T-50 Twin Cessna at the  Antique Aircraft Association (AAA). Joe has also restored a long list of other vintage aircraft including: 1947 Piper PA-11, 1940 Luscombe,  1942 Stearman PT-17, 1948 Cessna 140, 1947 Piper PA-12, 1946 Aeronca Champion, 1983 Pitts Special S1S, 1951 Bucker Jungman, 1966 Mustang II, and 1956 Cessna 180. The meticulous detail in Joe’s restoration efforts is also reflected in his dedication as a flight instructor. His many students over the years are now in the aviation industry across the globe and share the passion they learned from Joe Fleeman. The Federal Aviation Administration works closely with Joe on approvals of the aircraft he has rebuilt and they are always delighted at the quality and expertise of his restorations. Restoring and rebuilding antique aircraft, flight instruction, sage aviation advice and anything concerning flying from Joe Fleeman is always first class. He is a true artisan, the consummate craftsman, teacher, mentor and aviation professional. His dedication and devotion to the preservation of aviation and the quality of his work set a standard of excellence without parallel in aviation.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

Gen. Bruce W. Holloway, USAF

Gen. Bruce W. Holloway, USAF

(1912-1999) Enshrined November 3, 2012

Bruce Holloway’s hometown is Knoxville, Tennessee where he was one of two children of Frank P. Holloway and Elizabeth Keener.  He studied engineering for two years at the University of Tennessee before entering the U.S. Military Academy, where he graduated in 1937. After receiving his pilot wings at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, in 1938, he served for two years with the Sixth Pursuit Squadron – 18th Pursuit Group in Hawaii before taking a postgraduate course in aeronautical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Shortly after the United States entered World War II, he went to Chungking, China, to begin his combat experience as a fighter pilot with the famed “Flying Tigers” of the American Volunteer Group. Remaining with that group after it was activated as the Army Air Force’s 23d Fighter Group, Holloway became its commander before returning to the United States in 1944. During that tour in China, he earned status as a fighter ace, shooting down 13 Japanese planes. As commander of the Air Force’s first jet-equipped fighter group in 1946, Gen. Holloway  performed pioneer service in this new field of tactical jet air operations. After graduation from the National War College in 1951, he spent four years in Tactical Air Command as deputy commander of both the 9th and 12th Air Forces; and in 1961 he was named deputy commander in chief of the U.S. Strike Command At MacDill Air Force Base, FL. Later in that assignment, he also fulfilled additional responsibilities as deputy commander in chief of the Middle East/Southern Asia and Africa South of the Sahara Command. Holloway assumed command of the U.S. Air Forces in Europe in July 1965, serving in that capacity until his appointment as vice chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force August 1, 1966 and later served as Commander in Chief of the Strategic Air Command from 1968 to 1972. His decorations include the Army Distinguished Service Medal, Air Force Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, and foreign decorations which include the Order of the Sacred Tripod (China), Chinese Order of the Cloud, Chinese Air Force Pilot Wings, The Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany with Star and Sash, German Air Force Command Pilot Wings, The Most Noble Order of the Crown of Thailand-First Class–Knight Grand Cross, Honorary Royal Thai Air Force Wings, the Order of Aeronautical Merit (Brazil), and French Legion of Honor – Order of Commander. Gen. Holloway’s service to his country and aviation across the globe is an enduring testimony to his dedication to the freedoms of the United States of America.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

Robert E. “Bob” Minter, Sr.

Robert E. “Bob” Minter, Sr.

Enshrined November 3, 2012

While growing up in Kingsport, Bob Minter built model airplanes and spent endless hours at Tri Cities Airport longing to become a pilot. Following enrollment at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical Institute in Miami, Florida, he soloed a Piper J-3 Cub at Tamiami Airport on October 25, 1960; studied aeronautical engineering, airframe and powerplant technology and earned a Commercial Pilot’s license. Following graduation Bob built flying time as a freelance pilot flying a variety of single and multi-engine aircraft around the country and the Caribbean, worked with a major Cessna dealer and managed a small FBO in South Florida. In 1963, Bob became a corporate pilot based at TRI where he flew a Beechcraft Twin Bonanza and an Aero Commander 720 to destinations nationwide. He later returned to Miami to work for the newly formed Burnside-Ott Aviation Training Center. BATC became the largest civilian flight training organization in the world and during his eight years there Bob served in a variety of management positions. Minter again returned to Tennessee in 1973 to serve during Governor Winfield Dunn’s administration where he became Director of Development & Operations for the TDOT- Bureau of Aeronautics, the agency responsible for the State’s system of 76 public airports. While at the Bureau of Aeronautics, he oversaw the development of airports across Tennessee. After leaving state government, Bob formed his own firm, Bob Minter & Associates and contracted to sell advertising for AOPA PILOT Magazine and was a consultant to other major aviation clients.  AOPA contracted with Minter as the Regional Representative for member services and governmental affairs in the mid-eighties. To date, he has represented AOPA for more than 35 years and is currently employed as AOPA’s Southern Region Manager in eight states in the Southeast. Bob Minter has earned a reputation as a staunch advocate for general aviation and as an accomplished aviation policy strategist, marketing and technical consultant. He has served on numerous aviation technical and advisory groups throughout the Southeast; co-founded the Tennessee Aviation Association and Founded the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame. In 2002, The Tennessee Aeronautics Commission awarded Mr. Minter its highest individual honor for his “Career Contributions to Aviation”. Bob Minter has been an AOPA member for more than 51 years; a member of EAA and The Ancient and Secret Society of Quiet Birdmen – TYS Hangar.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com

Morris W. Ray, M.D.

Morris W. Ray, M.D.

Enshrined November 3, 2012

Beginning at an early age, Morris Ray soloed in 1953 at the age of 16. By age 18 he was a certified flight instructor and continued instructing while in medical school from 1959-1962. While serving his country in the U.S. Army, Dr. Ray was a flight surgeon flying medical missions leading to his career in medicine. He was also a flight instructor in the Army at Ft. Knox, KY and Ft. Richardson, AK. His lifelong passion for aviation has touched the lives of aviators across the world. Ray combined his talents as an aviator and doctor through his dedicated efforts with the Federal Aviation Administration on aviation medical and neurological issues, providing expert witness knowledge for the FAA. The aviation community and pilots across the United States have reaped the benefits of his valuable research focusing on the effects of flight and the neurological systems of the human body. Dr. Ray holds a ground level, unrestricted aerobatic competency waiver and has competed and performed as an airshow pilot with the Aeroshell T-6 Aerobatic team. A founding member of the Gold T-6 Aerobatic team, he performed at airshows across the country. In 1996, he performed at the OshKosh Airventure Airshow in a TBM-3. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the prestigious Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award in 2004, and Flight Instructor of the Year 2005 and 2008.  He continues his dedication to aviation as a Formation and Safety Training Specialist, Instructor and Check Pilot for the Commemorative Air Force, Designated Pilot Examiner for the Memphis Flight Service District Office and Chief Flight Instructor at Downtown Aviation in Memphis, TN. His lifelong support of aviation as a pilot, instructor and physician has provided valuable research for aviation and safety training to countless aviators. He has more than 11,400 hours of flight time in many aircraft types and continues his devotion to aviation. Dr. Morris Ray’s service to his country, to the advancement of medicine within the field of aviation and his extraordinary contributions to aviation have influenced and shaped flight safety for Tennessee and far beyond.

To learn more, visit: www.tnairmuseum.com