Gen. Albert Boyd, USAF

Gen. Albert Boyd, USAF

 (1906-1976) Enshrined November 1, 2014

Albert Boyd was born in Rankin, Tenn., in 1906. He graduated from high school at Asheville, N.C., in 1924 and attended Biltmore Junior college.

Appointed as aviation cadet in October 1927, Albert Boyd completed his flying training and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Air Reserve on Feb. 28, 1929. He received his regular commission as a second lieutenant of Air Corps on M ay 2, 1929. He was transferred to Chanute Field, IL, in August 1934 as engineering and operations officer and secretary of the Air Corps Technical School and served in Hawaii from 1939-1941.

Joining the Air Service Command in February 1943, General Boyd was assistant control officer at Patterson Field and the following April became chief of the Maintenance Division of the Middletown Air Service Command, Middletown, Pa. Reassigned to Patterson Field in January 1944, he was named special assistant to the commanding general of the Air  Service Command.

In 1944, General Boyd was named chief of the Maintenance Division at Wright Field, Ohio. The following July he was appointed deputy commander of the Eighth Air Force Service Command. Named acting chief of the Flight Test Division there in October 1945, the general became chief of the division the following January, assuming additional duty as an experimental test pilot, retaining that position when the Air Technical Service Command was re-designated the Air Materiel Command.

General Boyd assumed command of Edwards Air Force Base, Air Research and Development Command at Muroc, Calif. in August 1949. He was chiefly responsible for establishing the flight test center and made the selection of Chuck Yeager as the primary X-1 pilot. He became vice commander of the Wright Air Development Center, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in February 1952, and assumed command that June.

His decorations include the Legion of Merit and Distinguished Flying Cross. He is rated a command pilot, set a speed record of 625 mph in a Shooting Star, a combat observer and aircraft observer with over twenty five thousand hours of flying time.

For his extraordinary and enduring service and his contributions to aviation for Tennessee, our nation and the world, and for his service to our country, General Albert Boyd is honored by and inducted into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame this first day of November 2014.

Melton “Mike” A. Dover

Melton “Mike” A. Dover

Enshrined November 1, 2014

Mike Dover successfully transitioned from a distinguished career as a wartime Army Helicopter pilot to the Tennessee Highway Patrol Tactical Helicopter Squadron responsible for statewide Airborne Law Enforcement and Air Medevac programs.

From 1960 to 1972, Dover served two tours in Vietnam earning the Silver Star, Bronze Star with “V” device with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Purple Heart, Distinguished Flying Cross with one Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Commendation Medal, Army Aviation Badge, seventeen Air Medals, Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Silver Star, and the Combat Infantry Badge.

He developed search and rescue plans, trained personnel in emergency medical evacuations and trained the THP’s Tactical Squad to perform rescues, SWAT assaults, and rappelling. In 1977 Dover was instrumental in setting up Governor Lamar Alexander’s Task Force on Marijuana Eradication— a program still in place today.

Medevac Operation was put to the test at the 1982 World’s Fair in Knoxville. Anticipating ground traffic issues, Dover helped establish an airborne medical transportation plan. He was also instrumental in establishing medical helicopter operations at the University of Tennessee, the City of Chattanooga and at Vanderbilt Hospital.

During his 37 years in law enforcement, Mike Dover flew over every county in Tennessee many times, logging over 19,000 hours. Captain Dover retired from the Tennessee Highway Patrol in 2004 but continues to work with local sheriff departments as a consultant. He is a pilot with the Momentum Foundation of Tullahoma, and provides law enforcement departments with search and rescue, counter drug operations and aerial interdiction support.

For extraordinary service and enduring contributions to aviation for Tennessee, our nation and the world, and for his service to our country, Melton “Mike” A. Dover is honored by and inducted into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame this first day of November 2014.

Lt. Gen. Frederick McCorkle, USMC (Ret.)

Lt. Gen. Frederick McCorkle, USMC (Ret.)

Enshrined November 1, 2014

Lt. General McCorkle, born in 1944 and raised in Harriman, TN married Kathy Schwartz of Johnson City, Tennessee in 1966. It is said of General McCorkle, “He loves his wife, Kathy, aviation, the United States Marine Corps and the great State of Tennessee.”

McCorkle received his Bachelor of Science degree from East Tennessee State University in 1966, then completed Officer Candidates School and The Basic School at Quantico in 1967. He attended Naval Flight School, Pensacola, Florida and operational assignments included billets as commanding officer, Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One, First Marine Aircraft Wing, Okinawa, Japan; Second Marine Aircraft Wing, Cherry Point, NC and as commanding officer, Marine Aircraft Group Twenty-Nine, Marine Corps Air Station, New River, NC. As a general officer, he served as Commander, Marine Corps Air Bases Eastern Area and Commanding General, Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, Third Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station, El Toro, CA. He assumed the duties as Deputy Commandant for Aviation and advanced to the grade of Lieutenant General in August 1998.

As former Deputy Commandant for Aviation, Headquarters, Washington, DC, Fred McCorkle retired from the United States Marine Corps on October 1, 2001, after 32 years. During his service, Lt. Gen. McCorkle was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, The Legion of Merit with three Gold Stars, The Distinguished Flying Cross with Gold Star, The Purple Heart, The Air Medal with Single Mission Award and 76 Strike/Flight Awards, the Navy Commendation Medal with Combat “V”, and the Navy Achievement Medal.

Lt. General McCorkle served in Vietnam with HMM-262 and flew more than 1,500 combat missions. Throughout his career, McCorkle accumulated more than 6,500 flight hours in more than 60 different aircraft. General McCorkle has dedicated his life to the aviation community since the day of his first flight. He has demonstrated love and zeal for all things aviation.

For his extraordinary and enduring service and his contributions to aviation for Tennessee, our nation and the world, and for his service to our country, Lt. Gen. Frederick McCorkle is honored by and inducted into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame this first day of November 2014.

Harris “Wil” B. Wilhoite

Harris “Wil” B. Wilhoite

Enshrined November 1, 2014

Harris Wilhoite’s aviation career spans 61 years. After enlisting in the Army Air Corps in 1940, he entered Aviation Cadet Preflight School in 1943 then transitioned to the newly formed US Air Force and served through World War II and the Korean Conflict. Following a successful 25-year military career as an enlistee and officer, he retired in 1965. ”Wil” was hired as a Lear Jet Pilot for Executive Jet Aviation in Columbus, OH, by Brigadier General Paul Tibbets of Enola Gay fame. Wilhoite then landed a job with Federal Express in 1972 where he remained 24 years, until his retirement at age 80. He accumulated more than 25,000 hours of flight time in 25 different aircraft.

Military flight training introduced him to the Curtiss PT-14, PT-17, BT-13 and AT-6 before he graduated to the P-40 and P-47 during World War II. In 1947 he transitioned to the P-51 and B-25. After 101 combat missions in the F-80 during the Korean War, Wilhoite transitioned again as an instructor on the B-25, T-28, Navion, T-33 and F-86. He was a Flight Test Instructor on the C-47, C-45 and C-54. His civilian career included being an Instructor, Test pilot on the Lear Jet 23/14 and the DA-20 Falcon. His FedEx career included the B-707, the B-727, the DC-10 and the F-100.

Harris Wilhoite has been honored for his duties on multiple occasions. From the Navy, he received Wings of Gold and is a lifetime member of the Tailhook Society. FedEx awarded him the Bravo Zulu award seven times for exemplary crew performance. The FAA presented him with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award and he’s recognized on the National Aviation and Space Exploration Wall of Honor. He is a member of The Ancient Order of Quiet Birdmen and the Military Order of Daedalians.

Wil describes himself as, “This lad was presented an opportunity in life. Somehow I recognized it as such and seized upon it with great fervor. My Irish Honey, Patti, and I were married in October 1960. This was my life—the good, the bad, and the ugly. Finally, my name is Wil. Don’t forget.” For extraordinary and enduring service and contributions to aviation for Tennessee, our nation and the world, and for his service to our country, Harris “Wil” B. Wilhoite is honored by and inducted into the Tennessee Aviation Hall of Fame this first day of November 2014.